Alaska weather forecasting getting an upgrade with launch of next-gen satellite

first_imgClimate Change | Energy & Mining | Environment | Fisheries | Public Safety | WeatherAlaska weather forecasting getting an upgrade with launch of next-gen satelliteNovember 8, 2017 by Matt Miller, KTOO Share:A large area of low pressure moves through the Gulf of Alaska in this image from the Suomi NPP satellite, taken on November 6, 2017. The storm generated gale warnings for the south central and southeastern portions of the state. (Image courtesy NOAA/Environmental Visualization Laboratory)A new satellite will help predict Alaska’s weather and warn of natural hazards, much earlier and with better accuracy.Called JPSS-1 as the first in the Joint Polar Satellite System, the next-generation satellite features instruments that can see through clouds, determine sea surface temperatures, detect rising river levels, and spot small fires before they become big ones.The Earth rotates as the satellite orbits from pole-to-pole at an altitude of 512 miles. That means the satellite takes new, close-up pictures of the Earth during each hour-and-a-half orbit.It’s different than geostationary weather satellites, which orbit at an altitude of 22,300 miles and appear to remain fixed above a certain point on the equator.Geostationary satellites can’t see Alaska’s North Slope or the Arctic Ocean at the North Pole very well. Polar orbiting satellites, however, don’t have that problem.Dr. Mitch Goldberg, JPSS program scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said the satellite has five instruments that are all extremely accurate.“If the atmosphere has a temperature change of, let’s say, just a tenth of a degree, which is important to be able to forecast weather, these instruments can sense that change,” Goldberg said.A rendering of the new JPSS-1 satellite. (Image courtesy of NOAA)One instrument includes a Day-Night Band. Basically, it’s a high resolution camera that can pick up visible light at night and see things in the dark, like clouds, smoke and fog.Nate Eckstein, science infusion and technology transfer meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Alaska, said such visible imagery is very important for a state with long winter nights.“It gives us great detail to see hazards for aviation like fog in a mountain pass before the sun comes up,” Eckstein said. “To get that into the forecast or warn a pilot, many of whom in Alaska are general aviation.”Visual flight rules require pilots to see where they are going, and they cannot fly through clouds.“This ability to detect small areas in tight places where our general aviation aircraft are operating is really key,” Eckstein said.Infrared imaging used by many current weather satellites cannot distinguish between snow and clouds. They both show up as white in the image.In addition, cloud cover in Alaska may obscure important marine or land details for days, even weeks at a time.Eckstein has an example of how the satellite’s microwave instruments will be useful to the Bering Sea fishing fleet trying to avoid sea ice.“Traditionally, I know sea ice analysts would get lots of satellite imagery as one of their primary tools,” Eckstein said. “A lot of it would get discarded because there’s stratus, clouds covering the sea ice edge and therefore they have to go back and use some older imagery to know that’s at.”“Now, with microwave technology, we have the capability to see through these clouds in a lot of cases and know where the ice edge is on a more consistent basis, which leads to more accurate forecasts,” Eckstein said.This image of Alaska was taken by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite’s (VIIRS) Day-Night Band aboard NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite. The new JPSS-1 satellite will also have this instrument, which can see visible-spectrum light at night. This band allows forecasters to view features such as clouds, fog, smoke and even lights at night, which is an important feature for states like Alaska that have long nights in winter. (Image courtesy of NOAA NESDIS)The satellite can provide an earlier warning of developing storm systems in the Western Pacific Ocean, increasing the accuracy of long-range forecasts.Edward Liske, meteorologist and satellite focal point at the National Weather Service office in Juneau, said the new satellite also will provide more information about Alaska at a higher resolution. He said it’s going to provide a lot more data for the numerical models that generate forecasts.“It’ll hopefully make those numerical models preform a lot better and be able to bring forecast systems more accurately and more in advance than what we currently have,” Liske said.Warnings about wildland fires, ice jam flooding or heavy rainfall can also get to key decision-makers sooner.JPSS-1 is a more robust version of NOAA’s Suomi research satellite that was pressed into operation after a successful demonstration six years ago.The new satellite was supposed to be launched this Friday, Nov. 10 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, but that’s been pushed back until next Tuesday, Nov. 14. Once in orbit, the satellite — renamed as NOAA 20 — will be checked out for 90 days before it’s put into operation.Three more polar orbiting satellites in the series will be launched in the next several years.Share this story:last_img read more

The Broad Institute’s new leader wants to ‘double down’ on biology

first_img Tags BostonresearchSTAT+ The Broad Institute’s new leader wants to ‘double down’ on biology Log In | Learn More In the Lab It has been an action-packed pandemic for the Broad Institute, the biomedical research center in Cambridge with ties to both Harvard and MIT.First, the Broad set up one of the country’s first large-scale COVID-19 test processing facilities. Since March 2020, it has run more than 10 million tests for the state, nursing homes, universities, the Cambridge Public School system, and homeless shelters. The number of tests may be more than any other non-commercial lab has analyzed — though no one is certain. Scott Kirsner — Boston Globe STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? By Scott Kirsner — Boston Globe Feb. 9, 2021 Reprints Cyrus Moghtader for the Boston Globe Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED About the Author Reprints What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.last_img read more

Regulators issue new reporting guidance on systems outages

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Stock exchanges,  Alternative trading systems,  RegulationCompanies Canadian Securities Administrators Related news The Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) issued guidance for reporting major systems outages at exchanges and alternative trading systems (ATS).Following a review of the requirements on trading venues to report systems incidents, and a review of industry practices in this area, the CSA issued guidance to update the regulatory requirements and processes for reporting issues both to the CSA and the general public. James Langton 123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitter OSC seeks to extend cease trade in BFI case Regulators must avert looming irrelevance: IAP The guidance covers possible glitches in a range of systems, including those used for order entry, order routing, execution, trade reporting, data feeds and market surveillance.Among other things, the guidance aims to clarify the regulators’ expectations about the information that should be included in a marketplace’s initial notification, follow-up notifications and postmortem reports.“We expect an appropriate degree of transparency and timely notification of a material systems incident,” the CSA said, adding that this will allow investors, industry firms and regulators to decide how to respond when faced with a loss of service.The guidance also stressed that generic notifications to the public about outages does not qualify as notifying regulators. Instead, exchange staff must contact CSA staff directly. SEC charges five in US$2-billion crypto trading schemelast_img read more

26 Fire Units Retrofitted and Put Back into Service

first_imgRelated26 Fire Units Retrofitted and Put Back into Service 26 Fire Units Retrofitted and Put Back into Service UncategorizedApril 24, 2007 Related26 Fire Units Retrofitted and Put Back into Service Advertisementscenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Information and Development, Donald Buchanan, has said that 26 of the 30 fire units supplied by Rosenbauer have been retrofitted and put back into service.Mr. Buchanan, who was speaking at Monday’s (April 23) post Cabinet press briefing held at Jamaica House, informed that work on the remaining four units should be finished by Wednesday (April 25) and “with that we would have the full complement of new fire trucks”.The Rosenbauer fire units, which acquired by the government last year, were found to have various defects and a technical committee recommended that they be taken out of service for modifications.Meanwhile, the Information Minister said that Cabinet took note of the “blatant attempt” by Opposition Spokesman on Finance, Audley Shaw to use the medium of Parliament last week to mislead the public on the suitability of units supplied by Rosenbauer and Renault.According to Minister Buchanan “he (Mr. Shaw) attempted to give an impression that there was a 1998 report on the supply of fire trucks to the government of Jamaica, which indicated that whereas the Rosenbauer vehicles were not suitable to Jamaican conditions, the competing company’s (Renault) fire vehicles had been given a clean bill of health in the report.”“The report by the consultant, who provided the Ministry of Local Government with this particular advice in October of 1998, clearly indicated that with respect to the Renault fire fighting vehicles, there were failures resulting in downtime coupled with high spare part cost, which were found not to be in the interest of fire fighting capabilities of the Ministry of Local Government and the fire service,” informed Mr. Buchanan.He pointed out further that “equally, the report indicated that with respect to Rosenbauer, there were long downtime instances where the vehicles had malfunctioned, as well as what was indicated was high maintenance cost. So, in fact, this report was critical of both the Renault and the Rosenbauer units.” Related26 Fire Units Retrofitted and Put Back into Servicelast_img read more

HKU wins most top awards again in Web Accessibility Recognition Scheme 2020/21

first_imgHKU wins most top awards again in Web Accessibility Recognition Scheme 2020/21 HKU wins 20 top awards in the Web Accessibility Recognition Scheme 2020/21The University of Hong Kong (HKU) has won the most top awards again in the Web Accessibility Recognition Scheme 2020/21, with a total of 20 top awards and is the organisation with the highest number of awards out of 377 awardees in the Scheme this year. An award presentation ceremony was held today (April 14).HKU has won the most Accessibility Awards since the Scheme started in 2013. These results are an acknowledgement of the University’s ongoing commitment to making our websites and mobile apps more accessible and friendly to different members of the community, thus contributing to a more caring and inclusive society.The Scheme was organised by the Hong Kong Internet Registration Corporation Limited and co-organised by the Office of the Government Chief Information Officer, with the Equal Opportunities Commission as an independent advisor.The HKU award-winning websites and app:12 Triple Gold AwardsThe University of Hong Kong https://www.hku.hkU-Vision https://uvision.hku.hk HKU Libraries https://lib.hku.hkHKU Communications and Public Affairs Office https://www.cpao.hku.hkHKU Excellence Awards Presentation Ceremony https://www4.hku.hk/award/ceremonyHKU Congregation https://www4.hku.hk/congregHKU Honorary University Fellowships https://www4.hku.hk/honfellowsHKU Honorary Degrees Congregation https://www4.hku.hk/hongradsHKU Calendar https://www4.hku.hk/pubunit/calendarHKU Degree Regulations and Course Descriptions https://www4.hku.hk/pubunit/drcdHKU Quick Stats https://www.cpao.hku.hk/qstatsHKU News App (iOS platform) https://itunes.apple.com/hk/app/hku-news/id5814554148 Gold AwardsHKU COVID-19 Info Hub https://covid19.hku.hkHKU Faculty of Dentistry https://facdent.hku.hkHKU Faculty of Science https://www.scifac.hku.hkHKU Equal Opportunity Unit https://www.eounit.hku.hkHKU Bulletin https://bulletin.hku.hkHKU First and Foremost https://www.cpao.hku.hk/firstandforemostHKU Long Service Awards https://www.hku.hk/staff/lsa.htmlFilming on HKU Campus https://www.hku.hk/others/filming“Triple Gold Awards” are granted to websites/apps that have won “Gold Awards” for at least three consecutive years.To achieve the “Gold Award” level in the scheme, the platforms have to meet all judging criteria (24 for websites, 18 for apps) listed under the Gold Category for incorporating basic and key web/mobile application accessibility features. These criteria include providing a text re-sizing function, captions for videos, high colour contrast of texts, clear heading and informative links, well-structured contents and the option of performing all interactions through a keyboard interface.For details about the scheme, please refer to this website: https://www.web-accessibility.hk/en/ /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Accessibility, Award, Commission, communications, community, covid-19, fellowships, Government, Hong Kong, Internet, mobile, science, Society, university, University of Hong Kong, websitelast_img read more

Whale consumption should be dramatically decreased in Caribbean to avoid mercury poisoning

first_imgWhale consumption should be dramatically decreased in Caribbean to avoid mercury poisoning Researchers studying the level of mercury concentration of whales in the Caribbean were shocked to see dangerously high levels of the toxic substance in whale products sold for human consumption.Whale is part of the diet for many in St. Vincent and the Grenadines — one of only four places in the world where artisanal subsistence whaling is still allowed. Despite the popularity of whale meat in a nation where 48 percent of residents are categorized as poor or vulnerable to poverty, researchers say the government should launch intervention campaigns establishing dietary recommendations to limit whale meat consumption.“Whale products can contain high mercury levels, and consuming whale meat can cause health issues if consumed too often and in high quantities,” said FIU Institute of Environment marine sciences assistant professor Jeremy Kiszka, a co-author of the study conducted in partnership with local and international collaborators, including whalers’ representatives.Because they are at the top of the food chain, some species of whales carry so much mercury from all the prey they eat. Killer whales, known to eat sperm whales twice their size in the Caribbean, carry the highest levels of mercury.Eating a diet high in mercury can cause severe digestive and respiratory issues for people. Children born to mothers who consumed a high level of mercury may have developmental disabilities and cerebral palsy, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In St. Vincent and the Grenadines, whales are processed as soon as whalers arrive on shore. Meat is sold in bundles weighing about one-third of a pound and is consumed fresh, dried and then rehydrated, or cooked and stored in its own oil. Blubber is fried in whale oil and sold as a chicharron style snack called “crisps.” And oil is sold as a cold remedy.  /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Caribbean, children, developmental, diet, disease, environment, Florida International University, Government, Human, launch, prevention, Professor, species, sperm, study, university, Whale, worldlast_img read more

Women for WineSense Winemaking Roundtable hosts Wine & Spirits’ Luke Sykora,…

first_imgReddIt Facebook Email TAGSfeaturedLambert Bridge WineryWomen for WineSense Share Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Home Industry News Releases Women for WineSense Winemaking Roundtable hosts Wine & Spirits’ Luke Sykora, July…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessWomen for WineSense Winemaking Roundtable hosts Wine & Spirits’ Luke Sykora, July 22nd at Lambert Bridge WineryBy Press Release – July 1, 2015 70 0 AdvertisementHEALDSBURG, CALIFORNIA | JULY 1, 2015: The Napa | Sonoma chapter of Women for WineSense’s (WWS) Winemaking Roundtable will host Wine & Spirit’s professional California wine critic, Luke Sykora, at Lambert Bridge Winery, located at 4085 West Dry Creek Road in Healdsburg, California. The Roundtable will be held on Wednesday, July 22, 2015, from 3p.m.to 5:30 p.m.  Mr. Sykora will speak to the winemaker’s perspective on writing, critic’s evaluations and working with the press and other media.ABOUT LUKE SYKORABefore joining Wine & Spirits, Luke Sykora earned a MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and taught creative writing at the University of Iowa and the University of San Francisco. He started focusing on wine in earnest when he moved to California in 2007, and has since visited wine regions throughout the West Coast as well as in France.  In 2010 he joined Wine & Spirits as a wine critic and has moved his way up to Senior Editor of the magazine.  He runs the blind tasting panels for all domestic wines from every region to qualify for reviews, and serves as wine critic for all California AVA’s (other than Napa Valley).Based in San Francisco, Mr. Sykora has his ear to the ground as new wines enter the market, and visits growers and vintners throughout the state on a regular basis.  His perceptive commentary as a taster has impressed many.    Last year at the 10thannual Symposium for Professional Wine Writers at Meadowood, he received the Frank Prial Fellowship award sponsored by Meadowood, the Napa Valley Vintners and Culinary Institute of America. In his spare time, he also writes about beer in DRAFT Magazine.ABOUT THE EVENTThe roundtable meeting will open at 3:00 p.m. with welcome wines and networking followed by a brief behind-the-scenes winemaker tour at 3:30 p.m. with hosting winemaker Jennifer Higgins, a Sonoma native. She left medical school to pursue a career in wine twenty years ago mentoring with Zelma Long of Simi, then joined Lambert Bridge Winery five years ago, after serving as Lancaster Estate’s winemaker for years.At 4 p.m., the group will gather in the meeting room to enjoy tasting and the speaker’s presentation, followed by a question and answer session.  Attendees are encouraged to bring a bottle of their wine for the Roundtable hosts and speakers.   Attendees can mingle after the session.  Carpools from Napa, Sonoma and other locations are available.Roundtable chair Julie Hagler Lumgair noted, “We are honored to have Luke Sykora as our guest speaker.  His experiences with wines in Napa, Sonoma and beyond will provide a rich context for the discussion.  Our Roundtable is a rare opportunity to ask questions and interact with such an expert in a welcoming, and quite candid conversation.”Lumgair continued, “The Winemaking Roundtable’s past meeting topics have focused upon the skills women winemakers need but aren’t always easy to get in the daily winemaking environment.” She further explained that, “Held at some of the region’s finest host wineries, these programs have been a fantastic opportunity for women winemakers to connect directly, in a friendly professional forum, with experts that they otherwise wouldn’t get to meet for personal advice and questions.  Some of our recent speakers and hosts have included global consultant and olfactory expert, Alexandre Schmitt, at Cairdean Estate, Wine Enthusiast’s critic and writer, Virginie Boone, at Gundlach Bundschu; winemaking and strategic innovation from Francis Ford Coppola’s CEO, Tracy Geldert; media training at Markham with Sonoma County Tourism’s CMO, Tim Zahner; winemaker’s financial finesse with St. Supéry’s CFO, Lori Felando; winemaker career development at Vineyard 29 with Courtney Andrain of The Cypress Group and a holiday meeting at HALL’s newly restored Bergfeld Winery.”ABOUT THE WINEMAKING ROUNDTABLE: The Winemaking Roundtable meets approximately four to five times a year, taking a harvest break.  Each meeting provides a great time to reconnect and meet new colleagues. The free roundtable meeting is open to WWS Winemaking Roundtable members and, as space allows, to other interested women winemakers and viticulturists who have either emailed and/or received RSVP guest confirmations through the Winemaker Roundtable Chair. (See below.) Please, spaces are pre-approved; no walk-ins by non-members.Details of this event can be found under “Events” on the WWS Napa Sonoma website. To RSVP, or for any questions on this event or future WWS Winemaking Roundtable events, please contact Ms. Lumgair at [email protected] WWS ROUNDTABLES: WWS’ eight current professional roundtables serve to provide a safe and confidential environment to meet in small peer groups on a bi-monthly or quarterly basis. According to WWS’ Professional Development Director Susan Kornblatt Idell, “Members network, provide advice and support for one another, as well as foster educational occasions by inviting guest speakers in their fields and discussing ‘hot issues’ facing members in their day-to-day work.” She added, “Multiple Roundtables have developed for our members in finance, accounting and human resources fields in the wine industry. We also have roundtables in winemaking and the marketing/direct-to-consumer fields.”ABOUT WWS: Women for WineSense is a not-for-profit organization 501(c)6 formed in 1990 to help promote women working in the wine industry. WWS serves to help its members advance their careers in the wine industry by providing educational events, as well as aid wine enthusiasts in developing their wine knowledge. The Napa/Sonoma Chapter currently has more than 325 members of which 75% are professionals in the wine industry. To join or learn more about WWS’ roundtables, contact Susan Kornblatt Idell at [email protected], and for membership, please contact Ellen Reich Luchtel at [email protected] or visit the WWS chapter’s website: WWSNapaSonoma.com.Advertisement Previous articleVinexpo: a New EnergyNext articleAfternoon Brief, July 1 Press Releaselast_img read more

St. Mary Gets New Custos

first_imgRelatedPrime Minister Golding Announces Cabinet Changes RelatedCommittee to Monitor all Government Projects St. Mary Gets New Custos Office of the Prime MinisterMarch 1, 2013 RelatedPrime Minister Hands Over Keys for Longville Park Phase III Advertisements Distinguished hotelier and educator, Jeffrey Lorenzo McKitty, is the new Custos Rotulorum for the parish of St. Mary.Mr. McKitty was presented with the Grand Commission, appointing him to the position, by Governor-General, His Excellency, the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, during an installation ceremony at the Claude Stuart Park in the parish’s capital, Port Maria, on February 28.The new Custos was also conferred with the Order of Distinction, Commander Class (CD) by the Governor-General. He was previously awarded the Order of Distinction, Officer Class (OD). The Governor-General also presented Mr. McKitty with the Magistrates’ Roll for St. Mary.Mr. McKitty succeeds notable agriculturalist, Hon. Alrick ‘Bobby’ Pottinger, who retired as Custos in December 2012, after serving for 18 years. The new Custos performed his first official duty during the ceremony, when he presided over the administration of the Oath/Solemn Declaration and Affirmation of Allegiance for St. Mary’s Justices of the Peace. Minister without Portfolio, in the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing, Hon. Dr. Morais Guy, who represented Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, headed the dignitaries and other guests attending the ceremony.Others in attendance included: Chief Justice, Hon. Zaila McCalla; Assistant Commissioner of Police, Ealan Powell, who represented Police Commissioner, Owen Ellington; and Port Maria’s Mayor, Councillor Levan Freeman.In his charge to Mr. McKitty, the Governor-General urged him to effectively execute his duties to St. Mary’s benefit.“I urge you to seek and utilise good advice and to be open to adopting the best practices for the conduct of your role. I ask you to continue to give of your best in the mission which all of us must embrace, to make Jamaica the place of choice to live, work, raise our families and do business,” he said.The Governor-General also urged the Justices of the Peace and other residents to “support your Custos, as he seeks to carry out his duties on the service to all people of St. Mary.”He also thanked Mr. Pottinger for his services, noting that “he gave good leadership towards the attainment of the parish’s objectives.”“His understanding and appreciation of the culture of St. Mary enabled him to garner support for his undertakings. I believe that all of us recognise the passion and high standards which guided his service to this parish,’ he added. In his reply, Mr. McKitty described his appointment as “gratifying,” pointing out that he was “humbled” by the honour bestowed on him, “because I am acutely aware of its awesome responsibilities.”“As I accept this new position and its attendant responsibilities, I wish to thank (the Governor-General) most sincerely for affording me the opportunity to serve my parish and nation, at this level,” he said.He also thanked Mr. Pottinger, pointing out that “words cannot adequately express our appreciation for your unflagging, selfless (and) altruistic efforts for the advancement of our beloved parish.”Dr. Guy, in his address, also conveyed congratulations to Mr. McKitty, and expressed gratitude to Mr. Pottinger for his years of service.He noted that Mr. McKitty’s appointment comes at a time when more is being demanded of the nation’s leaders by the citizens, and underscored the need for consensus and collaboration among all stakeholders to ensure that national developmental objectives are achieved.Dr. Guy cited Mr. McKitty’s contribution to St. Mary’s development as an example of what can be achieved through collaboration and voluntarism.“He has been a model of professionalism, dedication to duty…and (portraying) respectful treatment of persons from all walks of life. This represents the standard for all persons, especially those in public life, that we expect to uphold. (The) example of this new Custos is one which I expect to inspire, not only the Justices of the Peace in the parish, but all who are exposed to his leadership and his influence,” the Minister said. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail last_img read more

Jamaicans Trained As Emergency Telecommunication Operators

first_imgThe island’s first batch of specially trained emergency telecommunication operators, who will provide critical communications support during disasters,  graduated on Thursday, (August 21) during a ceremony held at the Scouts Association of Jamaica Headquarters on Camp Road in Kingston.They were trained under the Emergency Telecommunications and Amateur Radio Communication training programme designed by the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM) with the support from HelpAge International.Emergency telecommunication operators are relied on for sharing on the ground reports, orchestrating deployment of rescue and response services in the event of a disaster.Minister of State in the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Colin Fagan, who attended the graduation ceremony commended the participants, noting that they have an important role to play.“You will be the critical eyes in ODPEM’s strategic effort to ensure that community, and national emergency and preparedness recovery occur at maximum efficiency,” he said.Senior Telecommunications Engineer at ODPEM, Ruel Corniffe noted that persons trained under the programme will be able to provide assistance to emergency response organizers as well as provide support to the national emergency operations centre.He informed that the training was mainly focused on persons in the eastern parishes of Jamaica such as St. Thomas, Portland and St. Mary.The Emergency Telecommunications and Amateur Radio Communication training programme is being implemented as part of the National Emergency Affiliated Radio Service, which is designed to strengthen Jamaica’s existing emergency communication capacities, focusing on effectively establishing and maintaining disaster emergency communication capacities that could extend to the wider Caribbean. Jamaicans Trained As Emergency Telecommunication Operators CommerceAugust 25, 2014Written by: Latonya Linton Jamaicans Trained As Emergency Telecommunication OperatorsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: JIS Photographer Director General, Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management, Richard Thompson (left); Senior Director, Hazard Mitigation, Weather Services, Ministry of Local Government and Community Development, Philbert Brown (centre); and Country Director, HelpAge International, Rhian Holder, examine communication equipment. Occasion was a graduation ceremony for the island’s first batch of emergency telecommunication operators held on August 22 at the Scouts Association of Jamaica Headquarters on Camp Road in Kingston. RelatedForum On Logistics Hub Initiative Held In Clarendon RelatedChoose Careers for Logistics Hubcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Advertisements RelatedPersons with Disabilities Urged to Partner with Government Story HighlightsThe island’s first batch of specially trained emergency telecommunication operators, who will provide critical communications support during disasters, graduated on Thursday, (August 21) during a ceremony held at the Scouts Association of Jamaica Headquarters on Camp Road in Kingston.Emergency telecommunication operators are relied on for sharing on the ground reports, orchestrating deployment of rescue and response services in the event of a disaster.Senior Telecommunications Engineer at ODPEM, Ruel Corniffe noted that persons trained under the programme will be able to provide assistance to emergency response organizers as well as provide support to the national emergency operations centre.last_img read more

Leadership: It’s Greek to them

first_imgIn the annals of mistaken predictions, Wired magazine’s challenge to Apple in 1997 to “Admit it, you’re out of the hardware game” might be worth downloading on your iPhone to remind you the next time someone gives you a sure bet, or in this case a sure loser. In the past 17 NFL seasons exactly two teams that were predicted to win it all went on to win the Super Bowl. From 1979-2014, 13 horses won the first two legs of the Triple Crown and every one of them from Spectacular Bid to California Chrome either failed to win or didn’t even start at the Belmont. All would have been favorites to win—which brings us to the United States and the Ryder Cup. Yes, I know the USA won the Ryder Cup in 2016, but the Americans haven’t won on foreign soil since 1993, so what is the likelihood that Paris will be any different from Spain, England, Ireland, Wales or Scotland? I have been told, mostly by those defending the losses of the U.S. teams, mind you, that match play is unpredictable, that on any given day anyone can win. A fair point. After all, Brian Barnes did beat Jack Nicklaus twice in one day at the Ryder Cup. But a closer look at the career Ryder Cup records of both men – Nicklaus, 17-8-3; Barnes, 10-14-1 – it’s obvious that, just as in medal play, over time the best players will win more often regardless of the format. Tiger Woods’ singles match play record (Ryder Cup, Presidents Cup, WGC Match Play, etc.) as a pro is 50-16-2. Add what he did as an amateur, winning six USGA match-play events in a row — three U.S. Juniors and three U.S. Amateurs — the argument that match play is unpredictable becomes less convincing. Indeed, by any definition the best match-play players of all time would include Woods, Nicklaus and Bobby Jones, who could easily be supported as the best medal-play players of all time as well. Over time, the unpredictability of match play washes away to insignificance. Only 12 of the 28 points up for grabs at the Ryder Cup involve singles matches. The other 16 are contested in team-play events. To understand the nature of that format, we must go beyond the obvious factors of world rankings and who is home or away and into the very nature of group dynamics, which it seems to me is what the Ryder Cup is really about. In the February 2016 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, researchers reported what happens when groups of leaders are put together to collaborate. The results were about as pretty as, well, the United States’ Ryder Cup record since 1995. In one experiment, six people were divided into three pairs. One person in each pair was told they were the leader and given complete control of a task in which they were to build a tower out of toothpicks and candy. The leaders were told to make all of the group’s decisions and even determine how much money was to be divided among them should their group design the highest tower. A control group, with no power manipulation, also took part. After this task was completed, the six people were divided into two groups with all three of the leaders in one group and all three of the followers in another group. They were assigned the creative task of designing a business. Independent judges rated the creativity and the interaction of the various groups. The control group and the followers’ group generated more creative ideas than the leaders’ group, which had more conflicts and proved less likely to work with each other and share ideas. More tests followed, with similar results. The research suggests that while leaders are very good at learning how to influence others, they are less likely to learn how to follow. As a result, when groups of leaders get together they may have difficulty in coordinating their activity. University of Texas professor Paul Woodruff, a classics scholar whose knowledge of the ancient world and military background influence his classes on leadership, often lectures about the problems that occurred as far back as recorded history among groups and armies when there were too many leaders. It is necessary, he argues, especially in this era where the assumption is that everyone should strive to be a leader, that leaders also know when to follow to optimize the potential of a group. Professor Woodruff often makes the analogy that today’s business world is not unlike the story in Greek mythology where Agamemnon struggled for years with how to best manage the Greek heroes Achilles, Ajax and Odysseus, who fought for him against the Trojan army. Is it merely a coincidence that Odysseus finally conceived of the Trojan horse and the Greeks defeated the Trojans, after Achilles and Ajax had died? As Professor Woodruff would say, there is only one corner office and only one No. 1. Tiger Woods has been the No. 1 player in the world for an astonishing period of 683 weeks. Phil Mickelson, though he never ascended to No. 1, has been the second-ranked player in the world a record 270 weeks. Additionally, Phil has been in the top 20 in the world rankings 1,085 weeks, a staggering period of 20 years and 10 months—more than twice the time of the Greek and Trojan war if you are keeping count, and 2 1/2 years longer than Tiger has spent in the top 20. Quite clearly, Tiger and Phil have been the dominant forces in the world of golf over the last 20 or so years. Except at the Ryder Cup. Since 1979, the year the Ryder Cup first became a competition between the United States and Europe, six men from either the U.S. or Europe have won four or more majors: Woods, Mickelson, Tom Watson, Seve Ballesteros, Nick Faldo and Rory Mcilroy. Their Ryder Cup records are as follows: Woods, 13-17-3, for a win percentage of 43.94 Mickelson, 18-20-7, for a win percentage of 47.87 Watson, 10-4-1, for a win percentage of 70.00 Ballesteros, 20-12-5, for a win percentage of 60.81 Faldo, 23-19-4, for a win percentage of 54.35 Mcilroy, 9-6-4, for a win percentage of 57.89 Perhaps it’s a coincidence that the only two players that have losing records in the Ryder Cup are Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson. Perhaps too it’s a coincidence that Tiger and Phil have played on seven Ryder Cup teams together and those teams have lost six times, with their only win coming in the most unlikely of comebacks at Brookline in 1999. It is worth noting that the average world ranking of the seven teams that Tiger and Phil have played on together have been almost twice as good as Europe’s, but those U.S. teams have been outscored, 109 1/2 to 84 1/2 points. The combined records of Tiger and Phil on those teams? 23-33-8. The week before the Ryder Cup in 2002, during the WGC-American Express event, Tiger was asked which event was more important to him, the WGC or the Ryder Cup. The WGC, he said. When asked why, he said flatly, “I can think of a million reasons,” which was the exact number of dollars he won that week. That same week he was asked if, because of the formalities at the Ryder Cup, multiple practice rounds and dinners , etc., all of which Tiger had complained about, would he consider one day skipping the event. To which he replied, “Let me ask you a question, would you rip me?” Implying that the obligation to play trumped the honor of playing. The day before the 2004 Ryder Cup, Phil Mickelson practiced not with his team, but by himself… on another golf course, and in 2014 Mickelson flew not with his team to the Ryder Cup but by himself, on his own plane, to Scotland. And at the end of the week, after yet another U.S. loss on foreign soil, when he was criticizing the strategy, not only of captain Tom Watson but of every captain that he had played for since Paul Azinger, he said that, “Nobody here was involved in any decisions,” although he had been asked at the beginning of the week who he wanted to play with and certainly would’ve made the decision all by himself to not fly with his team to Scotland. The point of rehashing the inelegant nature of some of Tiger and Phil’s Ryder Cup moments is merely to underscore how in my opinion they have been awkward participants both in their words and in their actions and that, combined with their competing personalities, has been the larger part of the losses of the teams they have played on. The “Blame Game” is never fun and there is no clearly defined responsibility for who’s accountable in each of these losses. Many want to claim that Europe simply cares more, a query put to many a player on both teams and dismissed by all, but none so poignantly as Lee Westwood back in 2002 when he stated that whoever said such a thing was speaking out of their backside, asking everyone thereafter to pardon his French. He went on to say that he had seen up close the passion in the eyes of the American players and that they wanted the Ryder Cup not one ounce less than the Europeans. Many want to argue that the Europeans just get along better and that makes all the difference, as if camaraderie alone would allow them to beat a team nearly twice as good as them over and over and over again. While camaraderie is hugely important to a team optimizing its potential, relationships ebbing and flowing as they do, it cannot be as simple as the Europeans have a few more laughs so they dominate a team nearly twice as good as them for more than 20 years. More likely it has been a combination of Europe coming close to optimizing its potential, a sort of alchemy that has eluded the United States, who has come nowhere close to optimizing its. The various U.S. captains, just as Agamemnon struggled with a surplus of heroes 3,000 years ago, have struggled to get the best out of the two best players in the world for the better part of two decades. It’s the Tiger and Phil dilemma, if you will. Which given the lopsided losses of the teams that they have been on together, is at least a plausible explanation for the results. It’s possible that there simply has never been two stronger competing personalities on a U.S. team than the duo of Tiger and Phil. Jim Furyk’s Ryder Cup captaincy will likely be defined by the impact that Tiger and Phil have on his team, and while both seem to have adopted a generosity of spirit toward the Ryder Cup in recent years, it remains to be seen if their presence on a team can be directed toward a purposeful whole.last_img read more